Category Archives: mopar

Shop Going Ons – 1st Week January 2020

More work on outfitting the Stacker.

The goal is to organize a 2′ shorter trailer with far less storage than the last one.

So far the oil shelves are up and the lift control mounted to side of top cabinet; coat rack, helmet hanger, and baskets for racing gloves and shoes are on the front wall.
The telescopic pole for the weather station is mounted on the wall. for storage.
A fire bottle is mounted to attic ladder.
Some of the Specialty Tools are in the lower cabinet. Sill more ae needing to be stored there.
Logs and cleaning supplies in upper cabinets
I still need to mount something to store my folding Director’s Chair.
In the attic I started drilling holes.
Pressed in some threaded inserts
Bolted in some angle iron, which can be quickly unbolted if I was to need some more flat floor space.
Spare Parts tubs ain’t goin anywhere. Yes, I need to flip the front floor bracket around.
Buster, my Ole Chocolate Lab, has been goin to races with me since 2005. He’s been having a rough time lately and can barely walk. However he was so excited that I was working all day in the Stacker that he found the strength to climb in and keep me company. His tail was wagging like he was a pup again.I sure hope he makes it long enough to go to a few more races. He’s never happier than when were. racing.
A couple feet of three in pipe with an end cap, and s a notched 4″ to 3″ reducer
and a little pewter paint
and I have a holder for the High Strength clear RTV that I use to seal my oil pan to the block
I mounted a couple baskets on the rear-side door to hold various items (gloves, carb caps, ..) often needed when working on the car in the pit. Also riveted three magnetic bars to door to securely hold a set of wrenches for convenience.
The other side door is also outfitted for convenience.
And a Wall Mount for my cordless drill. I’ll mount another for cordless Impact wrench

I still have to mount and wire up the winch, mount a cord-reel and air hose, install a radio and speakers, make a rack for Jack stands and mount some arrangement for hardware.

Ginger, My Magnum XE

The Gear Vendor Overdrive unit is on the transmission.

The master power switch is mounted in the console as is a USB port and 12V outlet for Bluetooth my Amazon Music and Sirus from my iPhone. The LEDs and the enable/disable switch for the overdrive are mounted on the console plate.

Plans are to change out those screws with something more appropriate.

I’m waiting on the driveshaft from Victory and I’ll have to modify the exhaust system as the overdrive interfere with the cross-pipe and need to make it curve away from the solenoid on the overdrive.

MoHawk

MoHawk is going to be part Mopar and part Studebaker Hawk. It is a custom Tube Chassis frame, rack & pinion steering, a Mopar 8.75″ rear end, a 340 ci Mopar motor, Tremek transmission, 63 GT Hawk body with 60 Plymouth rear fins, and a 53 Commander front clip.

This is where MoHawk’s chassis stands. Frame is powder costed in Satin black, as is the 8.75″ rear-end and Super Stock leaf springs.

The Skipper – My GT Magnum

Trunk has been taken tp bare metal, repaired and painted. I’m waiting on the floor pan plugs so the carpet can be reinstalled.

The grill is removed and will be dechromed and painted black. The bumpers will be removed, blasted and powder coated gloss black.

I’ll be reconditioning the clear plastic headlight covers and corner lens. The motor and transmission will be pulled, cleaned, painted and dressed up. Everything in engine compartment will be removed and the compartment also cleaned and painted before the engine and new under hood components replaced. The door jams will also be cleaned, scuffed and repainted.

And that’s it. The next report will also include work on the Screamin’ Woody and the Petty Tribute.

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MoparWiki Home Page Redesign

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Generation Next

Mopar's Generation Next

 

DallasWinZmax800

 

I just finished reading Rob Wolf's excellent editorial in the most current issue of Mopar Collector's Guide — called "Generation Next", an obvious play on Generation X.

In the editorial, Wolf points out that those of us who experienced the Muscle car Revolution first-hand — were the baby-boomers, and are now between 55-70. The Next'rs are in their mid-to-late thirties and their forties. They saw these cars in the childhood when they were still street driven and at shows. The editorial further points out that there is a crop of these Generation Next people working at dealerships, restoration shops, and racing — but they might be the end of the line, and the last to be able to even work on these cars.

That's very true in large part — but there are exceptions. My son Dallas is 24, has been racing Mopars since he was 16 (when he also obtained his NHRA Class IV License), is the crew Chief for all of the cars we race on a National Circuit — and yesterday won NMCA's 2011 "Crew Member of the Year" award at the Award's Dinner at PRI. The newest car he's ever raced is a 78 Aspen — and the oldest a 63 Plymouth. Steven, the Shop Rat at my shop is 19 and works part-time (25-hours a week) at my shop. He too is a Mopar man, and is capable of doing a engine/transmission swap on a mid-60s Mopar pretty quickly. He works for minimum wage because he is able to work on the old Mopars as much as swinging the mop. He has another part-time job where he pulls engines and transmissions on imports for twice what I pay him — but he rather work on old Mopars with us rather than working full time for his other employer. My youngest daughter is 13, and has been going to races with me since birth. She can tell you the year of any B-body and we're setting up my 10-second Vitamin C (63 Plymouth NSS car) for when she hits 16.

These kids are rare — but they do exist. They can exist in greater numbers if "Generation Next" will take the time to pass the heritage along. It takes a little psychology — and it takes getting to them when they're still young. In the case of Dallas, I took him to every car show and race I ever attended since he could be pushed in a stroller. He learned old Mopars before he could be corrupted but any kids with Imports. Same with motorcycles. I'm a Harley man, and much to his mother's chagrin, I bought him a large touring bike at 15 and took him riding with me until turning him on his own at 18. He learned from me, instead of on a crotch rocket by some punk with his hat on backwards and 300 body piercings. Steven's father is a die-hard Mopar man, and like Dallas, Steven never saw an import parked on the property. My youngest daughter was given her first go-cart at 5, and helped to assemble her 6-speed dune buggy at 8. She started driving on the property at 10.

My generation did a lot to create the Generation Next people, and now it is their duty to pass this along to their kids — and the earlier the better. Take them to car shows and tell them about why these cars are so special. Include them with the washing and working on your cars. Build a project together. I bought Dallas his first car at 15 — a 78 Magnum with a warmed over 360, as he had a special license to drive to and from school. He still has that car. We built his (now — but started as a 12-second) 10-second 72 Demon together when he was 15 — which we still have.

It doesn't have to end with the "Generation Next", if the Generation next will take the time to drag their kids away from the X-Box, and get them into the garage working on cars with them. A father is his son's biggest influence — and he only has a limited time to use that influence. My generation needs to do the same with our grandchildren.